Beam Research Program

Beam Research Program Personnel

The Beam Research Program conducts fundamental particle beam science and is developing advanced accelerators and technology for national defense, medicine and homeland security. Core competencies include:

  • High current accelerators
  • Intense beam dynamics
  • Pulsed power
  • Computational electromagnetics


We are developing advanced accelerators and technology for national defense,
medicine and homeland security



Major facilities are an essential part of our capability



 Staff
 
4
Physicists
 
11
Electrical engineers
 
2
Mechanical engineers
 
3
Designers
 
3
Mech techs
 
2
E techs
 
1
LEOT
 
3
SLO's
 
3
CRADA staff
 Facilities
 
B431
Pulsed Power and Laser labs, 50 m radiation vault
 
B423
CNC and general machine shop, inspection, design and assembly areas
 
B543
Offices
 
T4382
Offices
 Sponsors
 
External
  • CPAC, NNSA (current)
  • DARPA, JIEDDO, DTRA (anticipated)
  • AWE (possible)
 
LLNL
  • Industrial Paternerships Office (IPO)
  • Weapons and Complex Integration (WCI)
  • Global Security (GS)
 Core Competencies
 
  • High current accelerators
  • intense beam dynamics
  • Pulsed power
  • Computational electromagnetics
 
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DARHT

Maintaining a smaller, aging U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without underground nuclear testing requires the capability to verify and validate the complex computer calculations on which stockpile confidence is based. This capability, in turn, requires nonnuclear hydrodynamic tests (hydrotests) that can x-ray stages of the implosion process, providing freeze-frame photos of materials imploding at speeds of more than 16,000 kilometers per hour. The images will yield important information on shapes and densities of metals and other materials under the extreme pressures and temperatures generated by the detonation of high explosives. The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamics Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a two-arm x-ray imaging system that will provide such images, capturing the inner workings of a mock nuclear explosion with high resolution. Scientists compare the radiographic images with computer models, examine the differences, and refine the models to more accurately represent weapon behavior.